2 Oct 2020, 11:33 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Ahead of Print.
Seeking to make sense of the Greek crisis Odyssey and the attendant restructuring of the economy, this article focuses on the spatial dynamics of the crisis. To this end, it builds on Harvey’s concept of accumulation by dispossession and Gramscian hegemony to evaluate the crisis remedy administered to Greece. An attempt is made to demonstrate dispossession of land, public resources and natural assets as a hegemonic project, as it takes place, linked to specific ‘spatio-temporal fixes’ of capital during and after the crisis, to be either welcomed or opposed by different stakeholders in civil society and local communities. Assessing the new institutional setting that was enforced upon Greece by its creditors, the Greek case of land dispossession and grabbing is discussed, focusing on representative ‘optimum’ investment instances to question the rationale and the effectiveness of the emerging post-crisis neoliberal model of economic development.
22 Sep 2020, 9:37 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Ahead of Print.
The role of class struggle in historical materialism and Marx’s works is central in explaining political, social, and historical phenomena. While the two main classes, the proletariat and bourgeoisie, drive the progress of capitalist society, Marx also includes references to other classes such as the lumpen that are historically relevant in class struggle. This article puts forward that Marx’s understanding of the lumpen continually changes throughout his works and is integral, not just peripheral, to class struggle. By examining the chronology of Marx’s definition of the lumpen, I argue that Marx’s later works break from his earlier indictments of the lumpen as counterrevolutionary when he concludes in Capital that the lumpen are an exploited class due to their relation to productive labor in capitalism. This approach to understanding the lumpen in Marx’s works leads me to argue that the lumpen can be a possible revolutionary force in revolutionary class struggle. Connecting Marx’s works to contemporary times, I show that traditional lumpen ways of production and life are becoming more ubiquitous, due to recent political and economic trends, and therefore more important to incorporate into political movements. I will contend that current political discourse has worked to discount the political actions of the lumpen in countries such as the United States and the United Kingdom, while at the same time the lumpen class has considerably grown in such countries. I conclude that the political left must incorporate an understanding of the lumpen into its struggles if it is to seriously create a radical class–based politics in the near future.
22 Sep 2020, 9:36 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Ahead of Print.
This article explores variations of neoliberal policymaking in the United States and Japan, utilizing a comparative examination of labor-related policymaking under the current Abe Shinzo and Donald Trump Administrations, and focusing on three policy areas: the nexus of wage setting and tax policy, work hours, and public employment. The institutional analysis emphasizes that both countries have histories of neoliberal practice, especially in favoring corporate interests and opposing unions, but are less influenced by neoliberal doctrine per se than other advanced economic democracies. Examination of the two Administrations’ policies reveals that they have continued the legacy of favoring major corporations, notably in slashing corporate taxes, and also sought, dubiously, to justify these as benefiting ordinary workers. However, the Abe Administration exhibits the legacy of technocratic policymaking closely influenced by national bureaucrats, while the Trump Administration manifests the populist anti-state anger of neoliberal and right-wing policymaking of recent years. As a result, Abe Administration policies are shown to feature greater balance than those of the Trump Administration, causing less damage to worker interests, and more often proffering at least modest degrees of improvement.
21 Sep 2020, 10:26 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Ahead of Print.
Inequality has been increasing for decades in both rich and developing countries and the academic literature addressing it struggles to provide explanations, let alone solutions. This article is concerned with a relatively underexplored area, the relationship between macro-level inequality and organizational inequality. The core focus of the article is the recognition that the two phenomena are closely bound up one with the other. This is made possible by adopting Rousseau’s notion of inequality as hierarchy and willingness to accept subordination to authority and disparity of treatment. In doing so, we highlight similarities and dissimilarities between Rousseau and Marx. Inequality remains an issue of hierarchy at both the macro and organizational levels. As it was for Rousseau, so it is today but it is much more layered than in Rousseau’s day: inequality in society is the accepted degree of hierarchy among its members, inequality in the economy and at work is the extent to which, accepted or not, there is an imbalance of power, financial resources, remuneration of work and access to opportunities and services. The increase in inequality is due to a radical change in the socio-economic model of advanced economies. This change involves a shift towards financialization, a pressure on labour through flexibility, the decline of trade unions’ power and the retrenchment of public social spending.
21 Sep 2020, 10:24 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Ahead of Print.
Ontological and identitary questions affecting indigenous peoples are discussed through an assessment of the socio-spatial trajectory of the Guarani-Kaiowa of South America, employing an analytical framework centred around land, labour and ethnicity. These enhanced politico-economic categories provide important entry points for understanding the violence and exploitation perpetrated against indigenous groups, as well as their capacity to reclaim ancestral territory lost to development. Evidence indicates that ethnicity is integral to class-based processes, given that the advance of capitalist relations both presumes and produces difference and subordination. The case study in the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso do Sul demonstrates that the Guarani-Kaiowa became refugees in their own land due to ethnic differences, but at the same time their labour has underpinned the regional economy to a considerable extent through interrelated mechanisms of peasantification and proleterianisation. Trends of exploitation and alienation have intensified in recent decades due to racism and socio-spatial segregation, but the action/reaction of subordinate groups has also been reinforced through references to their ethnicity.
9 Sep 2020, 9:54 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Volume 44, Issue 3, Page 480-482, September 2020.
9 Sep 2020, 9:54 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Volume 44, Issue 3, Page 478-480, September 2020.
9 Sep 2020, 9:54 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Volume 44, Issue 3, Page 469-471, September 2020.
9 Sep 2020, 9:54 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Volume 44, Issue 3, Page 475-478, September 2020.
9 Sep 2020, 9:54 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Volume 44, Issue 3, Page 473-475, September 2020.