1 May 2024, 12:00 am
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Ahead of Print.
The trade union bureaucracy debate has significant implications for both analysis and union strategy. Recently receiving renewed academic attention, this debate centres around whether there is a dichotomy between rank-and-file workers and full-time union officials, and whether these officials – the trade union bureaucracy – tend towards industrial conservatism. The case study of labour relations in the Pilbara iron ore industry in the north of Western Australia 1965–1986 enriches our analysis of the trade union bureaucracy by viewing its role in the class struggle over a number of decades, in varying contexts of union development, union power and union decline. Throughout this entire period, there was significant conflict between the bureaucracy and rank and file. The remoteness of the Pilbara region, and workers’ industrial militancy makes it an extreme case suited to unveiling insights on the nature of the trade union bureaucracy. The Australian focus broadens a largely British debate. This article also offers a greater consideration of the role of full-time shop stewards’ convenors than has occurred previously. Finally, the trade union bureaucracy theory illuminates our understanding of this period in Pilbara labour history.
27 Apr 2024, 10:55 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Ahead of Print.
There has been considerable discussion regarding the regulation of platform-mediated forms of work, yet less attention has been paid to the actual impact of regulations already enacted. In this brief analysis, I examine the cases of Spain and Chile, policy benchmarks in their respective regions. While Spain has introduced a presumption of employment, Chile’s legislation leaves this point open but implicitly encourages classifying workers as self-employed. Nevertheless, both countries have encountered significant complications in implementing these laws, stemming either from the narrow scope of the legislation or from corporate strategies aimed at circumventing it, leading to ever more fragmented and prolonged regulatory battles. Looking ahead, trade unions and workers’ organisations should engage more strategically in the regulatory conflict, considering the enforcement problems emerging and, more importantly, preventing regulation from concealing the radical potential of these movements against precarious work more generally.
25 Apr 2024, 9:57 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Ahead of Print.
This article is a photo essay that presents the emotions of union activists in Hong Kong on the day the Confederation of Trade Unions (CTU) decided to cease their operation. It is nested within a larger research project on the new unionism movement in Hong Kong triggered by the anti-extradition law protest. Reflecting on these emotions, this article explores the possibility of using photography to facilitate more discussions on unionisation and labour activism. Such reflection could offer much insight into the leftist scholarship on solidarity and the revival of unionism in the contemporary global landscape.
22 Apr 2024, 10:11 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Ahead of Print.
This interview with Frigga Haug explores the thirteen thesis which were developed collectively during three different international conferences and Frigga Haug authored the 13 theses. The goal was to make the feminist movement sustainable with a Marxist spirit and to bring Marxism to life. The theses are a work in progress, a framework for the foundation of a Marxist-feminist international, they are sustainable enough for them to stand the test through the specific changed conditions of our historically determined spaces of movement, and flexible enough that they would not harden into chains.
16 Apr 2024, 10:20 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Ahead of Print.
This article offers a comparative analysis of the institutional settings and political dynamics in Australia and Argentina. This analysis is based on an understanding of nation-state political processes as forms of realisation of global-scale capital accumulation. After identifying a common specificity in their capitalist development based on the production of primary commodities under favourable natural conditions and the appropriation of ground-rent by competing social subjects, as well as the natural and historical conditions leading to differentiation, the article traces the common and distinctive political and institutional forms of realisation of the process of capital accumulation in both societies. The comparative analysis of the experiences of Argentina and Australia offered in this article provides a solid critique of mainstream types of institutional political economy.
16 Apr 2024, 4:56 am
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Ahead of Print.
8 Apr 2024, 9:59 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Ahead of Print.
Mosely’s book provides a vantage point for a critical analysis of the ‘transformation problem’, as it questions the dominant conceptions that reduce the methodological debate to a matter of constructing systems of equations; at the same time, it shares with them the reduction of the methodological question to a matter of interpreting Marx’s texts. Moseley interprets ‘Capital’ as a logical representation composed of a macro theory and a micro theory. The article starts by showing how this approach mutilates the organic unity between social capital and individual capitals. Consequently, focus is placed on Moseley’s presupposition of values as if they were given in prices of production to explain the determination of these same prices, as well as on his exclusion of gold’s exchangeability as a product of capital from the transformation process. The article extends the methodological analysis to the above-mentioned prevailing conceptions and their ideological basis. Next, it shows how they coincide with Moseley’s in the logical inconsistency of assuming that the value of total variable capital and total surplus value appear unchanged in prices of production, although the organic compositions of the spheres that produce their material content differ from the social average. At this point, the real issue is brought forward: it is not about interpreting Marx’s texts in search of a ‘given’ or an ‘invariance postulate’ to construct a model that satisfies them; the point is to follow Marx’s methodological proposal to reproduce by way of thought the concrete determinations that make values take the complete form of prices of production of a certain magnitude. Finally, the article follows this path to demonstrate how, even if the value contents of total variable capital and total surplus value remain quantitatively unchanged, the prices of production in which they necessarily take form will quantitatively differ from those value contents.
8 Apr 2024, 9:56 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Ahead of Print.
This article discusses the Marxist-Feminist Theses III and VIII. It is based on the ‘French-speaking materialist feminist’ theoretical perspective that has been developed at the end of the 1970s by Colette Guillaumin (with the concept of ‘sexage’), Monique Wittig (with the concept of ‘straight mind’), Nicole-Claude Mathieu, Christine Delphy and other members of the Nouvelles Questions Féministes journal’s board. The article first presents this theorization, which is too unknown to many English-speaking theorists. It then shows how ‘French-speaking materialist feminist’ theoretical perspective fully demonstrated that ‘sex’ was a structural social relation as much as class is (Gender relations are relations of production). The article also analyses how this theoretical perspective enables us to pay a deep attention to the ‘race question’. Therefore, it appears as the missing link that can help bridging at least two important theoretical and political gaps: first, between Marxist feminism and lesbian theory, and, second, between Black feminism and Marxist feminism.
20 Mar 2024, 3:45 am
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Volume 48, Issue 1, Page 180-182, March 2024.
20 Mar 2024, 3:44 am
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Volume 48, Issue 1, Page 174-176, March 2024.