19 Feb 2024, 2:55 am
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Ahead of Print.
This article offers an insight into the challenges faced by social movements when attempting to politicize the crisis of reproduction which took place during the COVID-19 syndemic in the city of Barcelona. The analysis provided here expands on the analysis of social reproduction theory and, more broadly, on Marxist feminist approaches. In fact, one of the factors accounting for the absence of politicization during the syndemic is the type of responses given to the emergency by the authoritarian neoliberal state, which were beyond those envisaged by the 10th thesis theorized by Marxism-Feminism and social reproduction theory. Thus, in this article, we argue that this situation is an opportunity to establish a dialogue between critical state theory and Marxism-Feminism to understand how the agency of the state may condition the social reproduction of life and block the emancipatory possibilities of care and the social struggles regarding the crisis of care, complementing thus the10th thesis of Marxism-Feminism.
18 Feb 2024, 8:33 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Ahead of Print.
In contemporary Marxist studies, there has been a revival of two classic categories of the Critique of Political Economy, namely, ‘formal subsumption of labour under capital’ and ‘primitive accumulation of capital’. In contradistinction to traditional usages, Marxists authors consider that both belong, not to the historical past of capitalist production, but to its actuality. Regrettably, this recuperation has not been accompanied by a more thorough assessment of the methodological and political dimensions that are contained in both categories. This article aims to address this issue in the light of Marx’s use of the categories of formal subsumption of labour under capital and primitive accumulation of capital. In doing so, it will be demonstrated that they refer to the same process, namely, the separation of labour from the objective conditions of production, and that, given this internal connection, they co-evolve throughout Marx’s economic works, from Grundrisse to Capital, volume I. Moreover, it will be seen that the substitution of primitive accumulation for formal subsumption must be understood in Marx’s shift from a systematic to a historical approach to the historical process by which the capitalist mode of production came to life; and that Marx adopted this new perspective on both methodological and political grounds. The article also discusses the importance of contemporary Marxist scholarship of this examination of the methodological and political premises of Marx’s use of the notions of formal subsumption and primitive accumulation.
17 Feb 2024, 2:23 am
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Ahead of Print.
This paper explores the connection between the current wave of populism, economic policies and governance practices. We first review the different ways in which populist political economy has been conceptualised, focusing on the relationship between populism and neoliberalism in terms of both policy and polity. We then briefly discuss right-wing populist governments’ recent economic policies and institutional changes. We argue that, while representing a continuation of neoliberalism in some areas, right-wing populism may, when in power, undermine neoliberal economic policies and institutional power by subverting governance norms and reintroducing the state as a major actor in the economy. To demonstrate and support our argument, we analyse the Israeli case, in which the right-wing populist leader Benjamin Netanyahu led three governmental coalitions between 2009 and 2019. We focus on the Israeli government’s response to the cost-of-living crisis and the housing crisis. We show that the populist Israeli government went beyond clientelism and welfare chauvinism and moved towards a more redistributive and expansionist economic agenda. To finance and legislate this agenda, it used unorthodox, short-term governance practices to bypass or overcome institutional limitations.
15 Feb 2024, 10:43 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Ahead of Print.
This article examines the importance of the dialectical method in Vygotsky’s research on verbal thinking. Specifically, it demonstrates the relationship between the unit of analysis in Thinking and Speech and the dialectical method followed by Marx in Capital, along with presenting the different stages of a child’s thinking (syncretism, complexive thinking and conceptual thinking) that emerged as a result of Vygotsky’s historical–logical research. Ultimately, this article argues that Vygotsky’s Thinking and Speech is compatible with Marxism and activity theory.
15 Feb 2024, 10:42 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Ahead of Print.
The limitation of capitalist principles and ethics has long been an issue for self-organized enterprises. Even though capitalist modes of labor organization, administration, and management are expelled from the workplace, issues of growth, investment, production, and circulation remain exposed to dominant forms of production. Nevertheless, communities of solidarity, along with spatial and techno-material settings, constitute the infrastructure of commoning practices in those endeavors. We compare the cases of the factory occupation movement in Argentina and the occupation of the Vio.Me. factory in Greece (2010), where a shift to self-organization emerged in the context of the Argentinian and Greek economic crises. We focus on struggles revolving around the use and ownership of spatial-material infrastructure and the production of use-values, highlighting the emancipatory potential of self-organization. Space and objects appear as a contested terrain, while at the same time, material settings are transformed, through the collectives’ participation in networks of distribution and solidarity.
15 Feb 2024, 3:05 am
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Ahead of Print.
On 18 April 2021, six of the most storied clubs in English football – Arsenal, Chelsea, Manchester City, Liverpool, Manchester United and Tottenham Hotspur – announced they would be joining a new breakaway European Super League. These proposals triggered vehement opposition from football fans, which catalysed the intervention of the UK government in the form of a fan-led review of football governance. The reaction to the European Super League – which collapsed within 48 hours – demonstrates that the commodification and globalisation of football is contested. This article applies the lens of moral economy to analyse the contemporary mobilisations of football fans in England counter to these processes. The novel application of a moral economy framework provides a fresh perspective within the extant literature on football fan activism. This article represents the first systematic application of a moral economy approach to the political sociology of contemporary sport and its fandom. Employing an expanded understanding of moral economy, the article extends its application beyond the analysis of pre-modern food riots popularised by E.P. Thompson, incorporating the insights of Karl Polanyi and Andrew Sayer. Adopting this broader meaning, the concept of moral economy enables us to explore emergent and dynamic forms of fan activism, which seek to contest the commodification of football. The supporter mobilisations against the European Super League are examined to illuminate this perspective. Through an exploration of the contingency of the moral economy of football fandom, this article expands, in conceptual terms, the literature on football-based social movements, connecting it to the wider commodification and financialisation of football (as an important aspect of everyday life) and the internal contradictions and crisis of advanced capitalism.
14 Dec 2023, 2:10 am
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Ahead of Print.
The area of Marxism and law has long been considered marginalised. However, hand in hand with the renaissance of Marxist theory in recent decades, neglect has finally been put to rest. As Marxists increasingly explore the connections between rights, law, democracy and capitalism, one text in particular has taken centre stage: The General Theory of Law and Marxism, published by E. B. Pashukanis in 1924. This article seeks to make three contributions to the field of Marxism and law. First, by proposing that Pashukanis’s polemic is best understood as a critique of a spectrum between formalism and instrumentalism, containing both differences and similarities, it rectifies the way in which these concepts most often either have been discussed at a too general level or been defined too narrowly. Second, by addressing the conceptions of abstraction and form in the General Theory, it reconstructs the concept of the legal form according to the spirit of Pashukanis’s thought to supersede the limits of the formalism–instrumentalism spectrum, despite the unevenness found in the letter of his text. Third, regarding the reconstruction of the concept of the legal form, it demonstrates how objections against Pashukanis’s focus on the sphere of circulation at the cost of production, his exclusion of inequalities of race and gender, and his structuralist, consequentialist or instrumentalist biases, which reduces the space for agency, processes and the relative autonomy of politics, ideology and law, can be reconsidered and challenged.
27 Nov 2023, 2:03 am
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Volume 47, Issue 4, Page 657-658, December 2023.
27 Nov 2023, 2:03 am
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Volume 47, Issue 4, Page 641-643, December 2023.
27 Nov 2023, 2:03 am
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Volume 47, Issue 4, Page 652-655, December 2023.