11 Jun 2024, 3:52 am
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Ahead of Print.
29 May 2024, 11:08 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Volume 48, Issue 2, Page 319-321, June 2024.
29 May 2024, 11:08 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Volume 48, Issue 2, Page 331-332, June 2024.
29 May 2024, 11:08 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Volume 48, Issue 2, Page 322-324, June 2024.
29 May 2024, 11:08 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Volume 48, Issue 2, Page 328-330, June 2024.
29 May 2024, 11:08 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Volume 48, Issue 2, Page 326-328, June 2024.
29 May 2024, 11:08 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Volume 48, Issue 2, Page 324-326, June 2024.
1 May 2024, 12:00 am
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Ahead of Print.
The trade union bureaucracy debate has significant implications for both analysis and union strategy. Recently receiving renewed academic attention, this debate centres around whether there is a dichotomy between rank-and-file workers and full-time union officials, and whether these officials – the trade union bureaucracy – tend towards industrial conservatism. The case study of labour relations in the Pilbara iron ore industry in the north of Western Australia 1965–1986 enriches our analysis of the trade union bureaucracy by viewing its role in the class struggle over a number of decades, in varying contexts of union development, union power and union decline. Throughout this entire period, there was significant conflict between the bureaucracy and rank and file. The remoteness of the Pilbara region, and workers’ industrial militancy makes it an extreme case suited to unveiling insights on the nature of the trade union bureaucracy. The Australian focus broadens a largely British debate. This article also offers a greater consideration of the role of full-time shop stewards’ convenors than has occurred previously. Finally, the trade union bureaucracy theory illuminates our understanding of this period in Pilbara labour history.
27 Apr 2024, 10:55 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Ahead of Print.
There has been considerable discussion regarding the regulation of platform-mediated forms of work, yet less attention has been paid to the actual impact of regulations already enacted. In this brief analysis, I examine the cases of Spain and Chile, policy benchmarks in their respective regions. While Spain has introduced a presumption of employment, Chile’s legislation leaves this point open but implicitly encourages classifying workers as self-employed. Nevertheless, both countries have encountered significant complications in implementing these laws, stemming either from the narrow scope of the legislation or from corporate strategies aimed at circumventing it, leading to ever more fragmented and prolonged regulatory battles. Looking ahead, trade unions and workers’ organisations should engage more strategically in the regulatory conflict, considering the enforcement problems emerging and, more importantly, preventing regulation from concealing the radical potential of these movements against precarious work more generally.
25 Apr 2024, 9:57 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Ahead of Print.
This article is a photo essay that presents the emotions of union activists in Hong Kong on the day the Confederation of Trade Unions (CTU) decided to cease their operation. It is nested within a larger research project on the new unionism movement in Hong Kong triggered by the anti-extradition law protest. Reflecting on these emotions, this article explores the possibility of using photography to facilitate more discussions on unionisation and labour activism. Such reflection could offer much insight into the leftist scholarship on solidarity and the revival of unionism in the contemporary global landscape.