30 Jun 2020, 10:44 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Ahead of Print.
The starting point of this text is the concern for the impacts that the extractive offensive is generating in the territories and means of existence that have historically guaranteed the sustenance and reproduction of human and non-human life on the planet. This offensive is part of a historical and continuous dynamic of exploitation and appropriation of nature for the accumulation of capital, that has intensified in all the countries of Latin America in the last two decades. In this text, I present some interpretative guidelines and bridges between critical Marxism, ecology and feminism to understand the socio-ecological impacts that the metabolism of patriarchal capitalism generates in the web of life. about it and would be helpful if we knew the exact timeline.
23 Jun 2020, 7:35 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Ahead of Print.
Capitalist relations are the crucial object of social critique due to their innate tendency to accelerate the metabolic rift and alienation, yet, I argue, our focus should stretch beyond capitalist relations. Indeed, both ecocidal and conservationist tendencies have occurred in multiple historical forms of social relations, including socialist societies, for example, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. These are phenomena that reiterate the social, rather than purely capitalist relations as the driver of environmental destruction. Metabolic rifts occur due to malfunctioning of the human–human/human–nature relationships and it is the elimination and prevention of that malfunctioning that must be the aim of radical environmental politics and policies, not merely (the necessary) elimination of capitalist relations. This article contributes to the symposium in three complementary ways. First, it critiques the application of dialectical reading of human–nature relations as articulated in the Foster–Moore debate in its own right. Second, it rearticulates that reading through the lens of the dialectical biospheric analytics of late Soviet ecology. And third, it invokes the dialectical thought of Evald Ilyenkov.
23 Jun 2020, 12:41 am
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Ahead of Print.
Calls against austerity have entered the political agenda of very different actors in the political spectrum – from social democratic to right-wing populist parties. In this article, we argue that the main failures in realizing these claims and thus overcoming austerity can hardly be explained only in terms of (lacking) political will. We rather approach this problem complex in the two emblematic cases of Italy and Spain by foregrounding the disciplinary effects of capital accumulation in both the countries through a long-term historical reconstruction of the fiscal and steering capacity of their respective state institutions. Despite key specificities in the respective fragile accumulation regimes, the main findings point to the fact that the structure of accumulation has imposed strong constraints in both Italy and Spain. An unstable and crisis-prone capital accumulation characterized by low productivity, a lack of sectoral diversity, regional fragmentation, as well as high levels of exposure and dependency within variegated capitalism have restricted state capacity – a tendency only ruptured in temporary boom-cycles. This, we argue, entails some major implications, first, to address the present failures of social democratic forces and second, to gauge the concrete transformative potential at the politico-economic level of populist calls for ‘breaking the chains’ of austerity.
23 Jun 2020, 12:41 am
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Ahead of Print.
The main purpose of this article is to confront the argument put forward by Giovanni Arrighi and Fortunata Piselli in their 1987 study on capitalist development in Calabria with recent, neo-institutionalist analyses of economic development. In particular, this article asks whether the main building blocks of Arrighi and Piselli’s analysis – the importance of social conflicts in determining the outcome of processes of social change, the multiple paths of peripheralization, the key role played by factor mobility across regions of the periphery – may be used in a discussion of current theories of economic development framed within neo-institutional theory. In particular, it can be argued that articulating a dialogue between neo-institutional analyses of economic change and Arrighi and Piselli’s approach may provide a very fruitful platform for a renewed discussion of the role of institutions in economic development, especially in the periphery of the world-economy. In addition, a reading of the 1987 essay informed by neo-institutional hypotheses and concerns may yield new insights to be gained from ‘Capitalist Development in a Hostile Environment’. The overarching concern of the article is theoretical, and the core of the article will be dedicated, therefore, to a confrontation between Arrighi and Piselli’s 1987 essay, on one hand, and, on the other hand, a selection of significant works within the vast literature that has emerged in recent decades on institutions and development.
21 Jun 2020, 9:22 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Volume 44, Issue 2, Page 295-297, June 2020.
21 Jun 2020, 9:22 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Volume 44, Issue 2, Page 297-299, June 2020.
21 Jun 2020, 9:21 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Volume 44, Issue 2, Page 301-302, June 2020.
21 Jun 2020, 9:21 pm
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Volume 44, Issue 2, Page 293-295, June 2020.
17 Jun 2020, 4:23 am
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Ahead of Print.
12 Jun 2020, 4:30 am
Capital & Class
Capital &Class, Ahead of Print.
Nature-conservation practices in the Global South are fraught with uncertainty due to fragile environmental governance and conflict stemming from their subaltern position in global capitalism, given the tension between human needs and habitat integrity. This article hinges on a recent effort spear-headed by the Centre of Conservation Studies at University of San Carlos in Guatemala, to discuss how a counterhegemonic narrative offers fertile grounds for a decolonized reading of the metabolic rift. I use my notes from eight workshops held in 2018 as the empirical body for a discourse analysis where the emerging categories have been singled out and problematized in the light of ethnoecological theory and David Harvey’s moments for the transition towards a post-Capitalist society vis-à-vis a prevailing environmental regime characterized by its verticality, lack of scientific substantiation, and proclivity to privilege exchange value at the expense of widening the metabolic rift. This regime arguably spawns several ecological rifts, namely the following: (1) between conventional scientific parlance and traditional ecological knowledge; (2) between utility-inspired natural resource management and local land husbandry practices; and (3) between nature as a reservoir of resources and nature as the sustenance for life. In addition, I present a case study where local advocacy in a peripheral community managed to bring about a relevant shift in the correlation of political powers by seizing the national legislation to achieve a transfer of property rights that enabled the inception of a brand-new nature reserve. The new conservation paradigm in question, this case seems to suggest, dovetails adequately with civil society’s efforts to foster nature-conservation practices, in line with human well-being and sound environmental governance. The latter provides some evidence for a principle of hope – à la Ernst Bloch – whereby, dissident groups are paving the way for a grassroots-oriented conservation science that eventually could bridge the metabolic rift.